The Companies (Amendment) Ordinance, 2019 – highlights

The Companies (Amendment) Ordinance, 2019 was promulgated on January 12, 2019.

It repeals and replaces the Companies (Amendment) Ordinance, 2018 promulgated on November 2, 2018.

The 2019 Ordinance amends several provisions in the Companies Act, 2013 relating to penalties, among others.

 

Key Highlights

  • Commencement of business – Declaration by the Director: The Ordinance states that a company may not commence business, unless it (i) files a declaration within 180 days of incorporation, confirming that every subscriber to the Memorandum of the company has paid the value of shares agreed to be taken by him, and (ii) files a verification of its registered office address with the Registrar of Companies within 30 days of incorporation.  If a company fails to comply with these provisions and is found not to be carrying out any business, the name of the Company may be removed from the Register of Companies.

Any default in complying with the said will invite a fine of INR 50,000 to be paid by the company.

 

  • Removal of a Company’s name from the register – If the Registrar has enough reason to believe that a company is not carrying on business then he, after a physical verification of the registered office, can remove the company’s name from the register of companies. The ROC can strike off a company if the address of Registered Office is bogus or an incomplete/ improper address.

 

  • Issue of shares at a discount: The Act prohibits a company from issuing shares at a discount, except in certain cases.  On failure to comply, the company is liable to pay a fine between one lakh rupees and five lakh rupees every officer in default may be punished with imprisonment up to six months or fine between one lakh rupees and five lakh rupees.  The Ordinance changes this to remove imprisonment for officers as a punishment.

 

  • Further, the company and every officer in default will be liable to pay a penalty equal to the amount raised by the issue of shares at a discount or five lakh rupees, whichever is lower. The company will also be liable to refund the money received with interest at 12% per annum from the date of issue of the shares.

 

  • Alteration of Articles – After this amendment, any conversion of a Public Company to a Private Company will not be valid unless approved by an order of the Central Government. Previously, the power to issue such an order was with the Tribunal.

 

  • Registration of charges: The Act requires companies to register charges (such as mortgages) on their property within 30 days of creation of charge.  The Registrar may permit the registration within 300 days of creation.
  • The Ordinance changes this to permit registration of charges: (i) within 300 days if the charge is created before the Ordinance, or (ii) within 60 days if the charge is created after the Ordinance. If the charge under the first category is not registered within 300 days, it must be completed within six months from the date of the Ordinance.  If the charge under the second category is not registered within 60 days, the Registrar may grant another 60 days for registration.

 

  • Annual Return:  Annual Return should be filed within 60 days from the date of the AGM, failure to this, penalty of Rs. 100 per day to Company + directors maximum Rs. 5 Lakh apart from ROC delay charges is applicable.

 

  • Penalty of Rs. 5 lakhs to Company secretary certifying wrong Annual Return.

 

  • Annual Financial Statement: Filing of Balance sheet with ROC within time limit- failure is costly for Company + Directors both. Penalty of Rs.100 per day + Rs. 1 lakh to Company + Director each.

 

  • Resignation of Auditor: The Return must be filed by the resigning Auditor within 30 days, failure to which the resigning Auditor is liable for penalty of Rs. 50,000 plus Rs. 500 per day.

 

  • Disqualification of Directors: A director can not become director in more than 20 companies. If he continues, he becomes disqualified now.

 

  • Company Secretary: Appointment of Company Secretary on the payroll (Private Companies having paid-up capital Rs. 5 crores & above) is mandatory. Default is now very costly- penalty increased substantially.

 

  • ROC may strike off a company if subscribers have not paid initial share capital after incorporation of a Company within 6 months.

 

  • Financial Year: The Indian subsidiary or associate or holding company of the foreign company may be allowed to follow any period as its financial period on an application made by such company if it is required for consolidation of its financials with the foreign company. Also the such period may or may not be one year.

 

  • Change in approving authority: Under the Act, change in period of financial year for a company associated with a foreign company, has to be approved by the National Company Law Tribunal.  Similarly, any alteration in the incorporation document of a public company which has the effect of converting it to a private company, has to be approved by the Tribunal.  Under the Ordinance, these powers have been transferred to central government.

 

  • Declaration of beneficial ownership: If a person holds beneficial interest of at least 25% shares in a company or exercises significant influence or control over the company, he is required to make a declaration of his interest. Under the Act, failure to declare this interest is punishable with a fine between one lakh rupees and ten lakh rupees, along with a continuing fine for every day of default.  The Ordinance provides that such person may either be fined, or imprisoned for up to one year, or both.

 

  • Resolutions and agreements to be filed – If the company fails to file a resolution and agreement before the specified time, the company shall be liable to pay INR 1,00,000 as penalty and in case of a continuing failure it will be extended further by INR 500 per day subject to a maximum penalty of 25 lakhs. For any officer who is liable, the penalty is of INR 50,000, and in case of a continuing failure it will be extended further by INR 500 per day subject to a maximum penalty of 5 lakhs.

 

  • Penalties in different sections – In section 191, the penalty is increased from a minimum of INR 25,000 to a minimum of one lakh rupees. In section 441, The maximum limit is increased from 5 lakh rupees to 25 lakh rupees.

 

Read the Ordinance Text  Companies-Amendment-Ordinance-2019

MCA extends Annual Return due date upto 31 Dec. 2018

MCA extends due date for Filings of Financial Statements & Annual Return up to 31.12.2018

Keeping in view the requests received from various stakeholders seeking extension of time for filing of financial statements for the financial year ended 31.03.2018 on account of various factors, it has been decided to relax the additional fees payable by companies on e-forms AOC-4, AOC (CFS) AOC-4 XBRL and e- Form MGT-7 upto 31.12.2018 wherever additional fee is applicable.

 

General Circular No. 10/2018

F.No. 01/34/2013 CL-V
Government of India
Ministry of Corporate Affairs

5th Floor, ‘A’ Wing, Shastri Bhawan,
Dr. Rajendra Prasad Road, New Delhi-1

Dated: 29.10.2018

To
 All Regional Directors,
 All Registrar of Companies, All Stakeholders.

Subject: Relaxation of additional fees and extension of last date of in filing of forms MGT-7 (Annual Return) and AOC-4 (Financial Statements) under the Companies Act, 2013– – reg.

Keeping in view the requests received from various stakeholders seeking extension of time for filing of financial statements for the financial year ended 31.03.2018 on account of various factors , it has been decided to relax the additional fees payable by companies on e-forms AOC-4, AOC (CFS) A0C-4 XBRL and e- Form MGT-7 upto 31.12.2018, wherever additional fee is applicable.

2. This issues with the approval of the competent authority.

Yours faithfully,

(KMS Narayanan)

Assistant Director (policy)

011-23387263

For the original circular, please read:  MCA General Circular No. 10/2018 dt. 29 Oct. 2018

MCA extends due date of DIR-3KYC / E-KYC of Directors

MCA extends due date of DIR -3KYC / E-KYC of Directors

In order to update the Directors database of The Ministry of Corporate Affairs(MCA), MCA has requested all Directors holding a DIN to complete DIN KYC before 15th September 2018.

To complete DIN KYC, the Director would be required to file a form known as DIR-3 KYC or DIN e-KYC.

The notification issued by Ministry of Corporate Affairs has been reproduced below:

 

 

Government of India 
MINISTRY OF CORPORATE AFFAIRS

Notification

New Delhi, dated 21st August 2018

G.S.R. …… (E).-In exercise of the powers conferred by sections 396,398,399, 403 and 404 read with sub-sections (1) and (2) of section ‘1-69 of the Companies Act, 2013 (18 of 2013), the Central Government hereby makes the following rules further to amend the Companies (Registration Offices and Fees) Rules, 2014, namely:-

  1. (1) These rules may be called the Companies (Registration Offices and Fees) Fourth Amendment Rules, 2018.
    (2) They shall come into force from the date of their publication in the Official Gazette.
  2. In the Companies (Registration Offices and Fees) Rules, 2014, in the Annexure, under the head VII, for note below Fee for filing e-form DIR-3 KYC, the following note shall be substituted, namely:-

“for the current financial (2018-2019), no fee shall be chargeable till
the 15th September 2018 and fee of Rs.5000 shall be payable on or after the 16th September 2018”.

[F. No. 01/16/2013 CL-V (Pt-I)]

 

Sd/-

K.V.R MURTY, JOINT SECRETARY

Purpose of E-form DIR-3 KYC

The main purpose of e-form DIR-3 KYC is to collect the latest information about the directors of all companies. The information to be provided while completing eKYC procedures include Aadhar, PAN, Passport number, address, phone and email. The information submitted must be authenticated by completing one-time-password (OTP) verification and by signing with Digital Signature of Director and a practising Chartered Accountant.

Applicability

All directors having a DIN as on 31st March of 2018 must file e-form DIR-3 KYC on or before 15th September of 2018. For all Directors who obtained DIN after 31st March, 2018, DIR e-KYC must be filed next year.

Documents Required

The following are the documents required to file E-form DIR-3 KYC:

  • PAN Card for identity proof
  • Aadhar Card for address proof
  • Recent passport size photographs
  • Personal Mobile Number and E-mail ID of director for OTP Verification
  • Digital Signature Certificate of the director (DSC) that must be registered on MCA Portal
  • Passport (if the person holds a foreign citizenship)

Certifying Authority

The E-form DIR-3 KYC has to be duly certified by the Practicing Chartered Accountant (PCA), Practicing Company Secretary (PCS) or Practicing Cost Accountant.

Penalties

If the DIN holders do not file DIR-3, the MCA will mark them as deactivated. If the DIN holder files e-form DIR-3 KYC after 31st August 2018, a fee of Rs. 5,000 will be charged.

Time Limit

All directors to whom DIN has been allocated as of March 2018, the e-form DIR-3 KYC has to be filed by September 15, 2018. Originally, the MCA had provided a due date of 31st August which was subsequently changed to 15th September.

 

How new single monthly GST return system will be implemented

The GST Council on Friday finally approved single monthly return with an aim to boost collections and compliance. The new system is scheduled to be implemented in next six months.

The Goods and Services Tax (GST) Council on Friday finally approved single monthly return with an aim to boost collections and compliance. The new system is scheduled to be implemented in next six months — but could take more time. “The Council has approved the new system of GST return but the software will take six months to get fully operationalised,” Finance Minister Arun Jaitley said.

However, from the preliminary information provided by the GST Council, the new system will be implemented in three phases. “While the initiative of GST return simplification appears to have crossed another milestone – the 3 Phase implementation plan of the revised returns format or procedures do not bring out the exact comfort that industry has sought so far,” Indirect tax expert Jigar Doshi of SKP Business Consulting told FE Online. He explained how the new single return filing system is planned for implementation.

The new return filing process would be introduced in three phases:

Phase 1: First six months

  • The current process of filing GSTR-3B and GSTR-1 will continue for the first six months.
  • Software for the new system will be developed during this phase.

Phase 2: Next six months

  • A single-monthly system of filing returns will be introduced for all taxpayers, except persons with nil liability and composition dealers. They will be filing quarterly returns.
  • A uni-directional system of uploading details of invoices by the supplier will be implemented. Recipients will get credit on the basis of these invoices.
  • For the first six months of the new system, a facility to avail provisional credit by the recipient will be available.
  • Suppliers will be uploading details of invoices and recipients will follow up with the supplier in case of any gap in the uploaded details.
  • Recipients will try and reduce mismatch through follow up only. No mechanism will be in place for the recipients to upload any invoice.

Phase 3: After 1 year

  • The new system of return filing will be fully implemented with no facility of provisional credit. Credit will be available on the basis of details of invoices uploaded by the supplier only.
  • If tax liability on uploaded invoices is not discharged by the supplier but the credit is availed by the recipient, the government would first recover the same from the supplier. However, the government would retain the power to recover the tax from the recipient also.

 

Source: Financial Express

SEBI puts in place new framework to check non-compliance of listing rules

Sebi has put in place a stronger mechanism to check non-compliance of listing conditions, wherein exchanges will have powers to freeze promoter shareholding and even delist the shares of such defaulting companies.

The move is aimed at maintaining consistency and adopting a uniform approach in the matter of levy of fines for non-compliance with certain provisions of the listing regulations.

Under the new framework, exchanges would have the power to freeze the entire shareholding of the promoter and promoter group in non-compliant listed entity also holding in other securities, the Securities and Exchange Board of India (Sebi) said in a circular.

Besides, exchanges can levy fines on non-compliant company, move the stocks of such firms to restricted trading category and suspend trading in the shares of such entities.

Further, in case an entity fails to comply with the requirements or pay the applicable fine within six months from the date of suspension, the exchange will need to initiate the process of compulsory delisting.

The new rules would come into force with effect from compliance periods ending on or after September 30, 2018.

Grounds for suspension from listing include failure to comply with the board composition including appointment of women director and failure to constitute audit committee for two consecutive quarters; failure to submit information on the reconciliation of shares and capital audit report for two consecutive quarters.

According to new rules, Sebi has asked stock exchanges to impose penalties ranging from Rs 1,000-5,000 per day on violation of certain clauses of the listing agreement like non-submission or delay in submission of document related to the company’s financial and shareholding details, failure to appoint women director on the board.

Besides, the exchanges can levy a fine of Rs 10,000 per instance for delay in furnishing prior intimation about the company’s board meeting and delay in non-disclosure of record date or dividend declaration.

Such fines will continue to accrue till the time of rectification of the non-compliance to the satisfaction of the concerned recognized stock exchange or till the scrip of the listed entity is suspended from trading for non-compliance with the provisions of Listing Regulations.

Such accrual will be irrespective of any other disciplinary or enforcement action initiated by stock exchanges or Sebi.

Further, if a non-complaint entity is listed on more than one exchanges, the concerned bourses need to take uniform action in consultation with each other.

The board of directors need to be informed about the non-compliance and their comments need be made public so that investors can make informed decisions.

The exchanges would have to disclose on their websites the action taken against the listed entities for non-compliance of the listing conditions, including the details of respective including the details of respective requirement, amount of fine, period of suspension, freezing of shares, among others.

Every bourse is required to review the compliance status of the listed entities within 15 days from the date of receipt of information. Also, exchanges need to issue notices to the non-compliant listed entities to ensure compliance and pay fine within 15 days from the date of the notice.

If any non-compliant listed entity fails to pay the fine despite receipt of the notice, the exchange will initiate appropriate enforcement action including prosecution.

If the non-compliant listed entity complies with the Sebi’s requirement and pays applicable fine within three months from the date of suspension, the exchange will have to revoke the suspension of trading of its shares after seven days of such compliance and trading would be permitted only in ‘trade to trade’ basis for a week from revocation.

Source: Times of India